Languedoc Home    Introduction     to See    to Do    Holidays     Langudoc Wine     Languedoc Life    Getting There    Property      History   Geography   Weather 
Cathars of the Languedoc    Cathar Castles    Languedoc Mysteries    Languedoc Books    Languedoc Photos    Articles    Emergencies    Languedoc Guides    More Information
Become lord of the Manor... Rent a Chateau in France!
 

Things to do in the Languedoc:   Cultural Activities:   The Limoux Carnival ( The Name in Occitan. Click here to find out more about occitan. Fécos,  The Name in French. Carnaval,  The Name in French. Carnival)

The typical village fête is held in late summer when the nights are still warm, and the crops and grapes have been harvested. But the annual fête in Limoux, is different in almost every respect. For a start it lasts not three days, but over two months; and not in summer but mid winter. It is the earliest and longest fête in the French calendar, starting in January and continuing until two weeks before Easter Sunday.

It is claimed that this fête has been held continuously since the middle ages. During revolutionary times an Arrêté of the Municipal Council dated February 1793 attempted to suppress it, but without success. No-one knows how it all originated. Some say it originally celebrated concessions made to the town by a nearby monastery during the Middle Ages. Others say that it was started by millers in the sixteenth century celebrating their successful trade with the kingdom of Aragon. Others link it with the local sparkling white wine called Blanquette de Limoux, an ancient wine that gave winegrowers in Champagne the idea for their product.

The earliest written record of the Limoux fête seems to be a regulation of 1604, but the truth is that the it has probably been evolving since well before medieval times, adopting new features over the centuries. At some stage it has been partially merged with the Christian Lent carnival, and with pierrot traditions. The introduction of women in 1972 was just the latest in a long history of evolutionary change. You will find modern musical instruments but also medieval cornemuses, Micky Mouse costumes and traditional pierrots, the latest fashions and Fransiscan habits. Hats range from medieval headgear through eighteenth century tricorns to top hats and baseball caps.

The Limoux fête is generally called a Carnival (Carnaval in French), but its real name is Fécos, the local name for its characteristic dances. It starts with a parade of the organising committee dressed up in comic masks, white baggy shirts and trousers, wearing red scarves and clogs, and carrying whips. These Meuniers (Millars) receive His Majesty, the King of the Carnival, a stuffed dummy, who will preside in a theoretical sort of way over the proceedings over the coming weeks.

 

 

  

Each weekend there will be more parades in the main square, stopping at the cafés shown on the left to entertain and annoy the customers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Every Saturday and Sunday (and on Shrove Tuesday - Mardi Gras) a bande will make a number of outings in and around the square. Each bande consists of a group of masked pierrots and their accompanying musicians who follow the pierrots from one café to another in the square, playing as they walk along, through a tunnel of spectators lining the ancient arcades.

  

Bandes
Les Meuniers
Las Encatados
Les Aïssables
Les Infialurs d'Achille
Les Blanquetiers
Les Brounzinaïre
Le Paradou
Les Pébradous
Las Femnos
Les Pitchouns
Las Coudenos
Les Anciens
Les Retraités
Les Estabousits
Les Taps
L'Aragou
Les Maïnatches
Les Copins
Les Arcadiens
Les Remenils
Le Pont-Vieux
Las Piotos
Les Drôles
Le Tivoli
Les Limouxins
Les Jouves
Monte Cristo

 

The Limoux Fecos.Pierrots wear a sort of uniform, the forerunner of our modern clown outfit. Each bande has its own distinctive colours, often based on the traditional Limoux version: black with brilliant shiny bands. Pierrots wear a curious expressionless mask. They each carry a long, flexible, decorated wand called a carabéna, and a large bag of confetti.

Pierrots dance rhythmically in time to the music, delicately moving their long springy wands over their heads. This rhythmic dance is the Fécos. In the old days flour and sweets were thrown around during the Fécos. Now confetti is used instead - seven tons of it each year. If you take photographs you will almost certainly receive a handful over your head, delivered with grace and panache when you least expect it.

 

       

 

       

 

The language of the Fécos, like the word Fécos itself, is Occitan, the traditional language of the area. Speeches are made and songs are sung in it. Nothing is sacred during the Fécos. Fun is poked at anything and anybody, from traditional local targets to national politicians and other figures in the news. Jokes and accusations that would offend in French seem to be accepted with good grace in Occitan, however risqué or slanderous. Some of the songs are traditional, some written specially for this year's festival. The musicians in each bande play a range of instruments: trumpets, trombones, clarinets, tubas and drums. The occasional cornemuse - a medieval bagpipe made from an entire animal skin - also makes an appearance. The bandes play from a selection of some eighty tunes, all in the local style, and not always easy for outsiders to tell apart. Some of them owe a recognisable debt to operas and operettas from the end of the 19th Century and beginning of the 20th.

 

 

 

Following the pierrots and the musicians come the goudils. They too are masked. But their masks and costumes are different - different from the pierrots' and different from each other. Each has a distinctive character - an old man, a cartoon character, a harlequin, a fat woman, a local dignitary, a clown, the President of the USA. It is often difficult to determine the real sex of a goudil. There are few limits, either to their inventiveness or taste.

There are over 20 bandes - each of which performs on just one day - once in the morning, once in the afternoon and once in the evening. Anyone can join a bande as a goudil - they are not members of the bande - but members of one bande quite often join other bandes as goudils.

   

 

Pierrots stop and speak to people. Their conversations or chines also generally end in the distribution of confetti, scattered over heads, rubbed gently into faces, pushed under hats or inserted into shirts.

The fécos is not just a spectacle, and those who witness it are not mere spectators. They are badauds, participants in the fécos with their own special name and their own special role. When they feel the sensuous caresses of a carabéna they become the centre of attention. The pierrot on the other end of the carabéna will be expecting to exchange witty repartee. "Te counaissi" (I recognise you) says the goudil disguising his voice, after which he may say something funny, or perhaps not so funny. The badaud responds with as much wit as possible. If he recognises the goudil as well he will have won the exchange.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The groups who do this are all local. They resemble medieval guilds. Children take part from an early age and the rules that are applied so strictly to everyone else are largely ignored for children in fact is often just an excuse to dress up and have fun.

The first outing starts at 11 a.m., generally inspired by a topical event, ribald or grotesque wherever possible. The 4:30 p.m. outing is slower and the costumes more traditional. The 10 p.m. outing is the most atmospheric with an even slower rhythm. It is lit by entorches. These are burning torches made using ancient techniques. They burn for a full 2 hours. By their light the pierrots process, slowly moving their carabénas and distributing confetti. It all makes a colourful spectacle. Other events are held from time to time, for example the king might be brought down to judge a spoof beauty contest.

 

At first glance you might imagine it had all been invented for the benefit of tourists, but this is not the tourist season. And there are older, deeper elements at play. The pierrots dress with almost religious care. Every action is dictated by rules, some written, some passed down by word of mouth. For example pierrots must never remove their masques in public. They must wear "very fine" escarpins and gloves, and a cagoule under their masques. They hold the carabinas in a special way. They must move slowly, dancing by moving only their arms and legs, not heads or bodies. They lead the musicians and interact with them - the interplay can be surprisingly intense. Only at their command will the music stop. There are always 14 musicians and if you look carefully you will notice that they are being conducted by the three rear-most pierrots. Goudils must always remain behind the musicians. There are secrets too. Those entorches are made with resins according to a jealously preserved method, dating from a time when people had their own recipes for such things.

 

       

 

Look a little closer still, and you will find yet older, darker elements. Chines for example are not always innocent fun. Anonymity allows things to be said that would otherwise remain unsaid. Those cagouls and masks, gloves and the disguised voices are important ways to help conceal a pierrot's identity. Many a badaud has been caressed by a carabéna, looked into a mask, and heard a strange voice confide some dreadful or embarrassing truth about questionable business deals, illegal activities or private family matters.

 

On the last night of the last day of Carnival, the Sunday before Palm Sunday, a trial is held of the King of the Carnival. At midnight His Majesty, the straw mannequin, is tied to a stake and judge, prosecuter, defence council, and an executioner make speaches - all in Occitan. The King is defended vigorously but the prosecution wins the case and the King is condemned to death. Through the fun and games there is a reminder that this is the area where the Cathars flourished, where the medieval Inquisition was created by Saint Dominic's Dominican friars, and where countless people were burned alive for the crime of chosing their own form of religious belief. Even the joke executioner in his black hood can send a chill down the spine.

 

 

 

Immediately after the trial the King of the Carnival is burned on a pyre in the centre of the main square, as the pierrots throw their carabénas and masques into the flames: They chant "Adiou paure canaval, tu t'en vas e iu demori jusqu'à l'annada que ven" (Goodbye poor Carnival, you go, and I remain until next year). Participants fall to their knees bewailing His Majesty's passing and bowing to the ground towards his burning remains, then stand up, join hands, and dance around the fire singing bawdy ditties about the coming Spring. They do this three times as the King burns, then the Carnival is over for another year.

 

The annual Spring election and sacrifice of a king is well known to anthropologists. It is a popular theme found in many cultures around the world marking the passing of one year and the birth of the new. In Europe it often points to origins not in the Middle Ages but in prehistoric times.

So the reason that the origins of the festival at Limoux seems so hazy is not that early written records have been lost. It is rather that the origins date back to a time before writing had been invented, a time when real people rather than straw effigies were sacrificed to help restore the sun, usher in the Spring and ensure a good harvest.

 

 

 

Click here to go to the main Limoux page Click here for more about Limoux.
Click here for more on Blanquette de Limoux and Cremant de Limoux
Click here for more photographs of Limoux Click here for more about Limoux.
Click here for more the Toque et Clocher at Limoux Click here for more about Limoux.
Click here for more photographs of the Languedoc and the Midi Click here for more about Limoux.

 

 

Index of Bands

 

    Meuniers
meaning   "Millars"
founded    
outfit   Plain shirt & trousers. Wooden Clogs.
colours   white with red scarf
mask   various
hat   optional white bonnet
gloves   white
carabine   whip instead of carabine
confetti   white in white bags
seat   N/A
    members of the committee

Always opens the fecos on the sunsay 12 weeks before Easter Sunday.

 
     
    Les Infialurs d'Achile
meaning   "troublemakers of Achilles" in Occitan
founded   1993
outfit   Pierrot
colours   blue and white
mask   white painted blue & gold
hat   blue & white
gloves   white
carabine   blue & white
ruff   blue & white
confetti   blue & white in white bags
seat   Café de la Terrace

 

 

 

Saturday Cycle
Used to parade anticlockwise around the square

 
     
    Les Remenils
meaning    
founded   1996
outfit   Pierrot
colours   green & orange
mask   white painted geen & gold
hat   green academic square with orange tassel
gloves   orange
ruff   orange
carabine   white with orange feather
confetti   white in orange bags
seat   Café de la Terrace

 

 

  Saturday Cycle
 
     
    Le Tivoli
meaning   Name of a promanade in Limoux
founded   1958
outfit   Pierrot
colours   grey & purple
mask   white painted
hat   grey, Gaston Phebus Hunters hat
gloves   black
ruff   purple edged with gold & jewels
carabine   purple with gold handle & feather
confetti   white in black & silver bags
seat   Café de France

 

 

  Members of Committee, Sunday cycle
 
     
    Les Droles
meaning   "The Funnies"
founded   2006
outfit   Pierrot
colours   orange & blue
mask   white painted
hat   orange bonnets
gloves   white
ruff   blue & orange
carabine   blue & orage with blue feather
confetti   white in blue bags
seat    

 

 

  Saturday Cycle
http://bandedecarnavallesdroles.midiblogs.com/
 
     
    Les Piotos
meaning   ????
founded   1993
outfit   gown
colours   black & white
mask   white with silver painting
hat   black with white rosette (and red wig)
gloves   black
ruff   white with black lacing
carabine   black & white with white feather
confetti   white in black bags
seat   Café Jo

 

 

  Saturday cycle
Twinned with the Estabousits
 
     
    Monte Cristo
meaning    
founded   1968
outfit   pierrot
colours   broun & bronze
mask   white with brown painting
hat   brown tricorn or brown broad brimmed hat
gloves   bronze
ruff   bronze
carabine   bronze with bronze & white feather
confetti   white in bronze bags
seat   Café des Arcades

 

 

  Members of Committee, Sunday cycle
There is an alternative much fancier version of the outfit worn by women
 
     
    Encantados
meaning   "Enchanted"
founded   1995
outfit   pierrot, two buttons
colours   white & blue or maroon
mask   white, painted
hat   blue or maroon sock hats
gloves   white
ruff   gold lamé & blue or maroon
carabine   silver
confetti   white in a blue or maroon bag
seat   Bistrot du Goût (x Café de France)

 

 

  Saturday Cycle
 
     
    Poupinetos
meaning   "Little dolls"
founded   2008
outfit   dress & drawers
colours   red & white
mask   white painted
hat   red broad brimmed hat
gloves   white
ruff   white
carabine   red and white with red handle and feather
confetti   white in red bag
seat    

 

 

  Saturday cycle
 
     
    Les Aïsables
meaning   "unbearables" in Occitan
founded   1981
outfit   pierrot
colours   red & cream
mask   white clown mask with red or green hair
hat   red bonnet or joker's cap
gloves   cream
ruff   cream
carabine   red and white with red handle and feather
confetti   white
seat   Café de Commerce

 

 

  Members of Committee, Sunday cycle
 
     
    Les Brounzinaïres
meaning    
founded    
outfit   pierrot, two buttons + one on each leg
colours   white & brown
mask   white , painted
hat   brown acorn hats
gloves   white
ruff   brown and gold
carabine   brown and gold with a white feather
confetti   white
seat   Café "Al Limos"

 

 

  Saturday cycle
 
     
    Les Rambaïurs
meaning    
founded    
outfit   pierrot
colours   red & white
mask   white, painted
hat   red
gloves   white
ruff   silver
carabine   red and white with red handle and feather
confetti   white
seat    

 

 

  Saturday cycle
 
     
    Les Blanquetiers
meaning    
founded   1973
outfit   pierrot
colours   purple & yellow
mask   white, painted
hat   conical, purple with 3 buttons
gloves   black
ruff   yellow
carabine   purple & yellow, with yellow feather
confetti   yellow
seat   Café du Commerce

 

 

  Member of Committee, Sunday cycle
 
     
    Pebradous
meaning    
founded    
outfit   pierrot
colours   blue & white
mask   blue, painted in gold
hat   black Gaston Phebus Hunters hat, blue band
gloves   black
ruff   white trimmed in blue
carabine   blue & gold, with a blue feather
confetti   blue & yellow
seat    

 

 

  Saturday cycle
 
     
    Sieurs d'Arques
meaning   name of a local wine cooperative
founded   1975
outfit   pierrot
colours   green & yellow
mask   white, painted
hat   green Gaston Phebus Hunters hat
gloves   white
ruff   yellow
carabine   green, with yellow feather
confetti   white
seat   Maison de la Blanquette

 

 

  Saturday cycle
The green represents vines and the yellow, grapes
 
     
    Le Paradou
meaning    
founded   1947
outfit   pierrot, parti coloured with 3 countercharged buttons
colours   black & white
mask   white, painted wth pink cheeks
hat   black with white button
gloves   white
ruff   black & white
carabine   black & white, with a white feather
confetti   white in a black bag
seat   Café Jo

 

 

  Member of Committee, Sunday cycle
 
     
    Les Anciens
meaning    
founded   1927
outfit   pierrot
colours   white & red/blue/green/purple/black
mask   white, painted
hat   white with red/blue/green/purple/black band
gloves   white
ruff   red/blue/green/purple/black
carabine   silver with red/blue/green/purple/black feather
confetti   white in a red/blue/green/purple/black bag
seat   Café des Arcades

 

 

  Always come out on Mardi Gras (Shrove Tuesday)
 
     
    Les Pitchouns
meaning    
founded    
outfit   pierrot or tunic & skirt with belt & two buttons (women)
colours   blue & gold or white & black (women)
mask   white, painted blue & gold or black & gold (women)
hat   white, rounded conical (acorn hats)
gloves   white or black (women)
ruff   gold fringed blue or black (women)
carabine   white with blue feather or black & white feather (women)
confetti   white in a gold bag or a black bag (women)
seat   Tivoli

 

 

  Saturday cycle
 
     
    Las Taps
meaning    
founded    
outfit   pierrot
colours   red & white
mask   white, painted
hat   red & gold jesters' cap
gloves   white
ruff   red & gold
carabine   gold with red feather
confetti   white in a red bag
seat    

 

 

  Saturday cycle
 
     
    Las Fennos
meaning   Occitan for "women"
founded   1972
outfit   CHANGES EVERY YEAR
colours    
mask    
hat    
gloves    
ruff    
carabine    
confetti    
seat   Café du Commerce

 

 

  Members of the Committee, Sunday cycle
 
     
    Les Estabousits
meaning    
founded   1982
outfit   pierrot
colours   bronze & brown
mask   flesh coloured, painted
hat   brown tricorn
gloves   white
ruff   cream & brown
carabine   bronze & brown, with brown handle & feather
confetti   white in a cream sack
seat   Café des Arcades

 

 

  Saturday cycle
Twinned with the Piotos
 
     
    Las Cudenos
meaning    
founded    
outfit   pierrot
colours   violet & black
mask   white, painted black, violet & silver
hat   black top hat with violet ribbon
gloves   white
ruff   black & violet
carabine   black & violet with violet-black-violet feathers
confetti   white in a black & violet bag
seat   Le Tivoli

 

 

 

Saturday cycle
http://carnaval.lascoudenos.free.fr/

 
     
    L'Aragou
meaning    
founded   1976
outfit   pierrot with 3 red buttons, red shoes
colours   brown & red
mask   latex, white, unpainted
hat   red acorn hat
gloves   white
ruff   red
carabine   brown & red, with red feathers
confetti   brown in a brown sack
seat   Café Jo

 

 

  Member of the Committee, Sunday cycle
 
     
    Les Afogats de Limoux
meaning    
founded   2009 ?
outfit   pierrot with three buttons on the front
colours   white & red
mask   white with painted red rose on the right and optional red stars and tears on the left
hat   white acorn hat with one red button
gloves   white
ruff   red trimmed white
carabine   white with red and white feathers
confetti   white
seat    

 

 

  Saturday cycle
 
     
    Les Retraités
meaning   Retired
founded    
outfit   none - goudil or pierrot
colours    
mask    
hat    
gloves    
ruff    
carabine    
confetti    
seat    

 

 

  always on a Friday
 
     
    Les Maïnatches
meaning   "Youngsters" in Occitan
founded   1988
outfit   pierrot and clowns
colours   various
mask   pierrot and clowns
hat   conical for pierrots, brimmed for clowns
gloves   various
ruff   conical for pierrots, top hats for clowns
carabine   various
confetti   white ?
seat   Café du Progress

 

 

  Saturday cycle
 
     
    Les Copins
meaning   "friends"
founded   2004
outfit   pierrot
colours   silver & indigo
mask   white, painted indigo
hat   grey acorn cap
gloves   indigo
ruff   indigo
carabine   white & indigo with an indigio feather
confetti   white
seat    

 

 

  Saturday cycle
http://cnature.free.fr/accueil
 
     
    Les Arcadiens
meaning   refers to the arcades of the square
founded   1956
outfit   white pierrot
colours   various
mask   laughing in the afternnoon, crying at night
hat   conical three buttons of the pierrot's colour
gloves   white
ruff   of the pierrot's colour
carabine   white with multicoloured and serrated feather at both ends
confetti   white
seat   Café du Commerce

 

 

  Member of the Committee, Sunday Cycle
 
     
    Les Limouxins
meaning   "Residents of Limoux"
founded   1966
outfit   robe
colours   mustard & maroon
mask   gold, plague doctor mask
hat   maroon lined mustard, or maroon conical cap
gloves   black
ruff   mustard & maroon
carabine   mustard & maroon with a black feather
confetti   violet in a black bag
seat   Café du Commerce

 

 

 

Always on the Saturday before the cemation
Always wheel a bed around with them
http://limouxins.site.voila.fr/

 
     
    Les Jouves
meaning   "The Youths" in Occitan
founded   1966
outfit   pierrot, white satin
colours   white
mask   various
hat   various
gloves   white
ruff   white
carabine   white with a white feather
confetti   white in a white bag
seat   al Limos

 

 

  Always on the Saturday before the cemation
 
     
    Le Pont-Vieux
meaning   name of a bridge in Limoux across the river Aude
founded   1952
outfit   pierrot
colours   black with red bands
mask   red loup
hat   black with red cockade
gloves   white
ruff   white
carabine   black & red, with a red feather
confetti   white
seat   Café des Arcades

 

 

  Member of the Committee, Sunday cycle
 
     
     

 

 

 

 

The Words of Adieu paure Carnaval - sung during the cremation

 

Adieu paure Carnaval (Occitan) Adieu pauvre Carnaval (Français) Goodbye Poor Carnaval (English)

 

Adieu paure, adieu paure,
Adieu paure Carnaval
Tu t'en vas e ieu demòri
Adieu paure Carnaval
Tu t'en vas e ieu demòri
Per manjar la sopa a l'alh
Per manjar la sopa a l'òli
Per manjar la sopa a l'alh
Adieu paure, adiu paure,
Adieu paure Carnaval

La joinessa fa la fèsta
Per saludar Carnaval
La Maria fa de còcas
Amb la farina de l'ostal

Lo buòu dança, l'ase canta
Lo moton ditz sa leiçon
La galina canta lo Credo
E lo gat ditz lo Pater

 

Adieu, pauvre, adieu pauvre,
Adieu pauvre Carnaval
Tu t'en vas et moi je reste
Adieu pauvre Carnaval
Tu t'en vas et moi je reste
Pour manger la soupe à l'ail
Pour manger la soupe à l'huile
Pour manger la soupe à l'ail
Adieu pauvre, adieu pauvre,
Adieu pauvre Carnaval

La jeunesse fait la fête
Pour saluer Carnaval
Marie fait des brioches
Avec la farine de la maison

Le bœuf danse, l'âne chante
Le mouton dit sa leçon
La poule chante le Credo
Et le chat dit le Pater

 

Adieu poor, adieu poor
Adieu poor Carnival
You are going and I remain
Adieu poor Carnival
You are going and I remain
To eat garlic soup
To eat fatty soup
To eat garlic soup
Adieu poor, adieu poor
Adieu poor Carnival

Youth makes the festival
To salute Carnival
Marie make the brioche
With the flour of the house

The cow dances, the ass sings
The sheep recites its lesson
The chicken chants the Creed
And the cat says the Pater Noster

 

The Words of Adieu paure Carnaval (alternative version)

     
Refrain
Adiu paure, Adiu paure
Adiu paure Carnaval
Tu t’en vas e ieu demori
Adiu paure Carnaval.

I
Le biou canta, l’ase dansa
Le moton ditz la lèiçon
E la lèbre canta l’credo
E l’aucèl ditz le pater.

II
Catarino la pissosa
Porta la civada als bious
E de blat a las galinas
Si vos que te fasquen d’ious.

III
La junèssa fa la fèsta
Totis les qu’i èm ongan
E les filhas fan las cocas
Per celebrar Carnaval.

IV
Pod pas beure, pod pas beure
Pod pas beure qu’es bandat
A manjat trop de salsissa
E de cambajon salat.

Refrain
Adiu paure, Adiu paure
Adiu paure Carnaval
Tu t’en vas e ieu demori
Per manjar la sopa à l’alh.
Refrain
Adieu pauvre, Adieu pauvre
Adieu pauvre Carnaval
Tu t’en vas et moi je reste
Adieu pauvre Carnaval.

I
Le bœuf chante, l’âne danse
Le mouton dit la leçon
Et le lièvre chante le credo
Et l’oiseau dit le pater.

II
Catherine la pisseuse
Porte de l’avoine aux bœufs
Et du blé aux poules
Si tu veux qu’elles te fassent des œufs.

III
La jeunesse fait la fête
Tous ceux qui sont là cette année
Et les filles font des gâteaux
Pour célébrer Carnaval.

IV
Il ne peut pas boire, il ne peut pas boire
Il ne peut pas boire tant il est saoul
Il a mangé trop de saucisse
Et de jambon salé.

Refrain
Adieu pauvre, Adieu pauvre
Adieu pauvre Carnaval
Tu t’en vas et moi je reste
Pour manger la soupe à l’ail.
Refrain
Adieu poor, adieu poor
Adieu poor Carnival
You are going and I remain
Adieu poor Carnival

I
The cow sings, the ass danses
the sheep recites the lesson
And the hare chants the Creed
And the bird recites the Pater Noster

II
Catherine the pisser
Carries the flour to the cows
And the corn to the chickens
If you want, she will make eggs

III
The young make the festival
All those who are there this year
And the girls make the cake
To celebrate Carnival

IV
He cannot drink, he cannot drink
He cannot drink, so drunk is he
He has eaten too much sausage
And to much salted ham

Refrain
Adieu poor, adieu poor
Adieu poor Carnival
You are going and I remain
To eat garlic soup

 

 

The Ten Rules of the Carnaval


"Bien maqué tu seras, portant de beaux escarpins et gants fins"

"Sous ton masque se trouvera, cagoule immanquablement".

" A ton épaule ne prendra point de besace, naturellement".

"A 11 heurs, 17 heures, 22 heures tu choisiras, air de folklore pour ce moment là."

"Au départ tu retiendras la musique bien sagement, car les premiers pas tu feras, sur le seuil du café majestueusement".

"D'un café à l'autre tu danseras, sans bousculade et énervement".

"Ni vite, ni lentement, vingt minutes suffiront largement".

"La musique tu méneras, avec amour dévotement. Pour celà faire, ne chineras, mais intrigueras tout simplement."

"A l'arrivée seul tu imposeras, à la musique ton mouvement. Et l'arrêt ne se fera que sur ton commandement".

"Ainsi, fier tu seras d'avoir vécu tous ces moments. Mais ton visage ne découvriras, que dans l'intimité seulement."

 

Back.   Back to last page. Up  a level to the Cultural Activities in the Languedoc page Next Section: Holidays in the Languedoc   Forward.
Languedoc Home     About this Site     Site Map     Links     Contact Webmaster     Copyright and Legal     Search site for: 
The Languedoc: property,holidays,climate,naturist beaches,wildlife,wines,history,geography and Cathar castles: the Languedoc Home Page
 Level 1 -  Languedoc Home Page: Languedoc climate & weather, holidays & vacations, tourism & travel, naturism and naturist beaches,property & accomodation, Cathars & cathar castles, food & wine, history & geography, French sports & games, mountains & and lakes, and everyday life in the Languedoc-Roussillon in the South of France.
 Level 2 - Click here to go back to the main page on Things to Do in the Languedoc-Roussillon.
 Level 3 - Click here to go back to the main page on Culture in the Languedoc-Roussillon.
 Level 4 - Languedoc website. You are at level 4.
 Level 5 - Languedoc links not available from here.

Fecos.
Las Fécos in Limoux
2 of 3